Sunday, August 20, 2017

TBR - August 20

Here is my latest to-be-read pile after a trip to the public library:


Kids, post YOUR TBR pile as a comment, along with your initials and last year's homeroom, and you can pick from the prize box the next time I see you (and add another book to your pile).

What Ms. Moore is Reading - Vacation Weeks 7 & 8

Here are some of the most recent books I've read and recommend for my students. They're all available from the public library, but any donations towards getting them into our collection are most welcome! Cover images and descriptions are from Goodreads.


Picture Books


The Firefighter Duckies are brave and strong. They rescue:

Gorillas in chef hats!
Whales in trees!
Dinosaurs on bicycles!


But when the emergencies requiring their attention become a little overwhelming, the Firefighter Duckies realize that they don’t have to be brave and strong to be helpful and kind.
 

This is my favorite cloud. . .because it's the one I am watching.
This is my favorite tree. . .because it's the one where I'm swinging.
This is my favorite tooth. . .because it's the one that is missing.

Follow a little girl as she takes you on a tour through all of her favorite things, from the holes she digs to the hugs she gives.









Middle Grade Novels


Binny Cornwallis has lost something. Something that wasn't really hers in the first place. With her best enemy Gareth and her beloved dog Max she turns detective to track it down, but the Cornwallis family are anything but helpful. Little brother James and his friend Dill are having an adventure of their own and big sister Clem is acting very strangely. And on top of all this, Binny suspects their next-door neighbour may be a witch ...






To Molly Nathans, perfect is: the number four; the tip of a newly sharpened number two pencil; a crisp, white pad of paper; her neatly aligned glass animal figurines. What’s not perfect is Molly’s mother leaving the family to take a faraway job with the promise to return in one year. Molly knows that promises are often broken, so she hatches a plan to bring her mother home: Win the Lakeville Middle School Slam Poetry Contest. But as time goes on, writing and reciting slam poetry become harder. Actually, everything becomes harder as new habits appear, and counting, cleaning, and organizing are not enough to keep Molly’s world from spinning out of control.





Nonfiction


Margaret Hamilton loved numbers as a young girl. She knew how many miles it was to the moon (and how many back). She loved studying algebra and geometry and calculus and using math to solve problems in the outside world. Soon math led her to MIT and then to helping NASA put a man on the moon! She handwrote code that would allow the spacecraft’s computer to solve any problems it might encounter. Apollo 8. Apollo 9. Apollo 10. Apollo 11. Without her code, none of those missions could have been completed. NOTE: I'll be reading to Grade 1 as part of our Hour of Code lessons in December.




Nadia Comaneci was a feisty and fearless little girl who went from climbing trees in the forests of Romania to swinging into history at the 1976 Olympic Games, where she received an unprecedented seven perfect scores in gymnastics. But as readers will see in this first-ever illustrated picture book about Nadia’s journey to Olympic gold, the road from small-town girl to world-class athlete was full of many imperfect moments.


Thursday, August 10, 2017

What Ms. Moore is Reading - Vacation Week 6

Here are some of the most recent books I've read and recommend for my students. They're all available from the public library, but any donations towards getting them into our collection are most welcome! All cover images and descriptions are from Goodreads.


Picture Books


When Andrew gets hold of a pencil, anything can—and does—happen in this innovative and artistic book. The story literally unfolds step-by-step as readers are invited to follow Andrew through flaps and gatefolds. After sharpening his drawing implement on the first page, Andrew challenges the boundaries of each spread by beginning with a line that leads . . . and leads . . . to unexpected finishes. Staircases become dinosaurs, kites become rockets, and even the most unassuming squiggle morphs into a giant chicken!





Jabari is definitely ready to jump off the diving board. He's finished his swimming lessons and passed his swim test, and he's a great jumper, so he's not scared at all. "Looks easy," says Jabari, watching the other kids take their turns. But when his dad squeezes his hand, Jabari squeezes back. He needs to figure out what kind of special jump to do anyway, and he should probably do some stretches before climbing up onto the diving board ... NOTE: Gaia Cornwall will be at the RI Festival of Children's Books and Authors in October, and I'll be reading this to K-2 students beforehand. 


What can you do with two blobs of clay? Create something amazing! But don't leave them alone for too long. Things might get a little crazy. In this photographic friendship adventure, the claymates squish, smash, and sculpt themselves into the funniest shapes imaginable. But can they fix a giant mess before they're caught in the act? NOTE: I may or may not add this to our Mock Caldecott list. I love it, but the speech bubbles and details in the clay might not work as a large group readaloud.







Middle Grade Novel


Twelve-year-old Henry Hewitt has been living by his wits on the streets of London, dodging his parents, who are determined to sell him as an apprentice. Searching for a way out of the city, Henry lands a position as an assistant to Sir Richard Blackstone, an aristocratic scientist who performs unorthodox experiments in his country manor. ... One of Sir Richard’s experiments accidentally transforms a normal-sized tarantula into a colossal beast that escapes and roams the neighborhood. After a man goes missing and Sir Richard is accused of witchcraft, it is left to young Henry to find an antidote for the oversized arachnid. Things are not as they seem, and in saving Sir Richard from the gallows, Henry also unravels a mystery about his own identity.




Nonfiction


Award-winning author Grace Lin joins science writer Ranida T. McKneally to get kids talking about the science of food, the five food groups, and what a healthy meal looks like. Answering questions like "why are so many vegetables green?", "What's the difference between brown bread and white bread?", and "Why do beans make you gassy?", cheerful haiku poems and a simple Q&A format make this book a nutritious treat.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

TBR - August 9

Here is my latest to-be-read pile after a trip to the public library:


Kids, post YOUR TBR pile as a comment, along with your initials and last year's homeroom, and you can pick from the prize box the next time I see you (and add another book to your pile).

Thursday, August 3, 2017

RICBA Trailers, Online Form, eBooks Available

I finally finished reading all of the RICBA nominees ... kids, how many have you made it through? As a reminder, here's the list of books. (Titles in blue have book trailers available.) All you need to do is read 3 of them to vote in February. You'll have to read more than 3 to participate in the Rooster Games ... but more on that later (we're meeting with Miss Emily at the public library later this month to figure out how they'll work).

If you've read any this RICBA nominees this summer, you can submit your forms online - fill out a new one for each book.

If you'd like to read a RICBA nominee online, I JUST figured out how to set that up for you using Destiny Discover. Here's what you need to do (12 are currently available):

Via computer

1. Click on this link and then log in

  • User Name: CKL and your lunch code (school ID number)
Example: CKL12345
  • Password: Your birthday in 6 digits (MMDDYY)
Example: If you were born on May 5, 2009, your password would be 050209

2. Search for the book

3. When you find it, click on the "Checkout" button to claim it.


Via a device

To check out the e-book to a device like a phone or tablet, download the Destiny Discover app. Once installed and open, it will ask you to find your library and then have you log in.

NOTE: Any checkouts to your account will be available via all platforms.

Monday, July 31, 2017

TBR - July 31

Here is my latest to-be-read pile after a trip to the public library:



Kids, post YOUR TBR pile as a comment, along with your initials and last year's homeroom, and you can pick from the prize box the next time I see you (and add another book to your pile).

Edited to add the books I picked up on 8/1:


What Ms. Moore is Reading - Vacation Weeks 4 & 5

Here are some of the most recent books I've read and recommend for my students. They're all available from the public library, but any donations towards getting them into our collection are most welcome! All cover images and descriptions are from Goodreads.


Middle Grade Novels


Charlie wishes his life could be as predictable and simple as chicken nuggets. And it usually is. He has his clean room, his carefully organized bird books and art supplies, his favorite foods, and comfortable routines. But life has been unraveling since his war journalist father was injured in Afghanistan. And when Dad gets sent across country for medical treatment, Charlie must reluctantly travel to meet him. With his boy-crazy sister, unruly twin brothers, and a mysterious new family friend at the wheel, the journey looks anything but smooth.





Twelve-year-old Warren has learned that his beloved hotel can walk, and now it's ferrying guests around the countryside, transporting tourists to strange and foreign destinations. But when an unexpected detour brings everyone into the dark and sinister Malwoods, Warren finds himself separated from his hotel and his friends and racing after them on foot through a forest teeming with witches, snakes, talking trees, and mind-boggling riddles. NOTE: This is a sequel to "Warren the 13th and the All-Seeing Eye," which I also highly recommend.





Nonfiction


On the morning of August 6, 1926, Gertrude Ederle stood in her bathing suit on the beach at Cape Gris-Nez, France, and faced the churning waves of the English Channel. Twenty-one miles across the perilous waterway, the English coastline beckoned. Lyrical text, stunning illustrations and fascinating back matter put the reader right alongside Ederle in her bid to be the first woman to swim the Channel and contextualizes her record-smashing victory as a defining moment in sports history. 






This clever picture book introduces the concept of animal characteristics by highlighting how there can be both differences and similarities within a group. For example, the zebra gallops, the bumblebee flies, the lemur leaps and the tiger prowls ... But look closer now ... We all have STRIPES! And so it goes. ... Observant children will notice that one of the animals from each group also appears on the following spread with three new animals that have a different characteristic in common. NOTE: I'm adding this to our first grade categories unit.




If you were the moon, what would you do? You'd spin like a twilight ballerina and play dodgeball with space rocks! And more.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

TBR - July 20

Here is my latest to-be-read pile after a trip to the public library:



Kids, post YOUR TBR pile as a comment, along with your initials and last year's homeroom, and you can pick from the prize box the next time I see you (and add another book to your pile).

Sunday, July 16, 2017

What Ms. Moore is Reading - Vacation Weeks 2 & 3

Here are some of the most recent books I've read and thought my students would like. They're all available from the public library, but any donations towards getting them into our collection are most welcome! All cover images and descriptions are from Goodreads.


Picture Books


As one artist incorporates accidental splotches, spots, and misshapen things into her art, she transforms her piece in quirky and unexpected ways, taking readers on a journey through her process. Told in minimal, playful text, this story shows readers that even the biggest "mistakes" can be the source of the brightest ideas--and that, at the end of the day, we are all works in progress, too. NOTE: 2018 Mock Caldecott nominee








Little Louie is stuck in bed with a bad cold. His nose is clogged, his ears are crackling, and his brain feels full. All he wants is his mom to take care of him, but whenever he calls out for her, his stuffed-up nose summons slobbery dog Bob instead! As Louie tries and tries to make himself understood in this funny picturebook, kids will love calling out with him, "Bob, not Bob!" NOTE: 2018 Mock Caldecott nominee







Middle Grades


When cell phones are banned at Branton Middle School, Frost and his friends come up with a new way to communicate: leaving sticky notes for each other all around the school. It catches on, and soon all the kids in school are leaving notes—though for every kind and friendly one, there is a cutting and cruel one as well.

In the middle of this, a new girl named Rose arrives at school and sits at Frost’s lunch table. Rose is not like anyone else at Branton Middle School, and it’s clear that the close circle of friends Frost has made for himself won’t easily hold another. As the sticky-note war escalates, and the pressure to choose sides mounts, Frost soon realizes that after this year, nothing will ever be the same.



Mori and her friends live a normal life on Firefly Lane in their utopian community, Old Harmonie. In a world this safe and perfect, they've never had to question anything . . . never had to wonder about how their lives came to be. Until a new girl named Ilana moves in. She's so perfect that Mori and her friends are curious . . . Where exactly did Ilana come from, and why does she act so strange sometimes? When Ilana's secret is revealed, the kids on Firefly Lane must decide: is it finally time to start questioning the only world they've ever known? NOTE: 2018 Rhode Island Middle School Book Award nominee





Nonfiction


The phenomenon of desperate refugees risking their lives to reach safety is not new. For hundreds of years, people have left behind family, friends, and all they know in hope of a better life. This book presents five true stories about young people who lived through the harrowing experience of setting sail in search of asylum. Aimed at middle grade students, Stormy Seas combines a contemporary collage-based design, sidebars, fact boxes, timeline and further reading to produce a book that is ideal for both reading and research. Readers will gain new insights into a situation that has constantly been making the headlines. 




Born in Scotland more than 250 years ago, William Playfair was a dreamer who saw the world differently from other people. Unfortunately, this difference sometimes got in the way of his success. Early on, as he attempted to apply his unique perspective to a series of career opportunities in order to gain "riches! fame! glory!" he instead suffered one failure after another. Then, while writing a book about economics, Will's innovative vision inspired an idea that would set him apart: he created the first modern line graph. Next came a bar graph and later a pie chart. These infographic inventions provided a way for numbers to be seen as pictures, which ... changed the way the world would interact with data forever. NOTE: I'll be adding this to our Grade 2 curriculum.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Grade 3 Autobiography Poems

I spent the last hour or so of the school year with the third graders; as their final assignment, they created autobiography poems. I'll give them back at the end of fifth grade so they can see how they have (or haven't) changed. For now, here are some of the ones that students were ok with me sharing online (some ran out of time to finish all of the lines):

Sadie
Funny, curious, athletic, friendly
Sister of Shepherd and Holden
Likse reading, riding her bike, playing soccer and softball, and hanging out with family and friends
Dislikes potatoes
Needs a book to read ... once she finishes, needs a different book
Dreams of meeting her Pawpaw
Wants to be an electrical or aerodynamics engineer
Would like to meet Barack Obabma
Wants to go to Washington D.C.
Sadie

Alicia
Friendly, funy, kind, super
Loves her family and pets
Likes reading, dancing, skating, and playing outside or inside
Dislikes mean people
Needs to read
Dreams of having magic powers
Wants to be a nurse practitioner
Would like to meet Trump
Wants to go to all of the U.S. states
Alicia

Room 17 student
Cute, silly, playful, nice
Son of his mom
Likes playing and snuggling
Dislikes meanness
Dreams of having fun all day
Wants to be a great person
Wants to go to Disneyland
Room 17 student

Emma
Curious, nice, sporty, artistic
Granddaughter of James Manzi
Likes playing soccer, doing chemistry, planting, playing outside, and ice cream
Dislikes violence
Needs food, water, sleep, music at night, a night light, and lots of milk
Dreams of having a mansion, being rich, and having three huskies
Wants to be a famous soccer player
Would like to meet Sabrina Capenter and Sofia Carson
Wants to go to Florida and Hawaii
Emma

Room 18 student
Pretty, friendly, nice, good at cursive
Grandaughter of Peter
Likes art, animals, clothes, and making brownies
Dislikes (sadly) bacon
Room 18 student

Allie
Nice, graceful, dancer
Cousin of Samantha Boffi and Mike Ryan
Likes dogs, books, and dancing
Dislikes buillies
Dreams of being the best dancer
Wants to be a special education teacher and a pro dancer
Would like to meet Jiff Pom
Wants to go to Disney
Allie

Room 18 student
Funny, fast, flexible, great climber
Daughter of her mom
Likes riding her wheels that she has, simming, and electronics
Dislikes when people are mean
Needs funnies in her life
Dreams of being a mermaid or unicorn
Would like to meet a unicorn
Wants to go to Disneyland and Great Wolf Lodge
Room 18 student

Elyse
Dancer, funny, weird, cool
Granddaughter of Georgia Damashi Cormier
Dislikes going on roller coasters
Needs bows, chocolate, dogs, unicorns, and mermaids
Dreams of being a professional softball player
Wants to be a famous person
Would like to meet JoJo, Sabrina Carpenter, or Sofia Carson
Wants to go to Hollywood
Elyse

Room 17 student
Curious, majestic, hyper, positive
Daughter of her parents
Likes dinosaurs, food, sleep, drawing, animals, and her family
Dislikes homework
Needs her doggos, her family, food, and sleep
Dreams of studying for her PhD at Princeton in paleontology
Wants to be a paleontologist
Would like to meet Tim Burton
Wants to go to California
Room 17 student

Brooke-Isabella
Friendly, silly, creative, crazy
Granddaughter of Joann Jonston
Likes airplanes, Florida, swimming, her siblings, and ice cream
Dislikes fighting
Needs sleep, lots of juice, music, and going to the store
Dreams of having a big family
Wants to be a teacher
Would like to be a unicorn
Wants to go to California
Brooke-Isabella

Room 18 student
Generous, friendly
Sister of Bob Kabush
Likes reading, baking, playing with her dog
Dislikes mean or grumpy people
Needs water, sleep, and dogs
Dreams that because of her, there are no such things as kill shelters
Wants to be a soccer player
Would like to meet Alex Morgan
Wants to go to Utah and see Best Friends Animal Shelter
Room 18 student

Bob Kabush
Weird, nice, friendly, awesome
Brother of Peppa Pig
Likes sports, falling, and being weird
Dislikes annoying people
Needs food and water
Dreams of being a sports star
Would like to meet Tom Brady
Wants to go to California
Bob Kabush

Room 17 student
Silly, crazy, kind, sensitive
Sister of her sister
Likes videogames and animals
Dislikes mean people
Needs sleep
Dreams of being a zookeeper or vet
Wants to go to Disney
Room 17 student



Saturday, July 8, 2017

TBR - July 8

Here is my latest to-be-read pile after a trip to the public library:


Kids, post YOUR TBR pile as a comment, along with your initials and last year's homeroom, and you can pick from the prize box the next time I see you (and add another book to your pile).

Monday, July 3, 2017

What Ms. Moore Is Reading - Vacation Week 1

Here are some of the most recent books I've read and thought my students would like. They're all available from the public library, but any donations towards getting them into our collection are most welcome! All cover images and descriptions are from Goodreads.


Board Book


Everyone knows the sun is hot. But open the flaps in this book and you may find a chilly surprise instead! Each spread of this cleverly designed board book reveals a surprising opposite that makes for a truly original way for toddlers to learn about words and concepts. Whether it be hot or cold, clean or dirty, slow or fast, this book has you covered—at least until you open the flaps. 

My take: LOVE. Ingenious. Will add to my Grade 1 Opposites lesson






Early Reader


Giraffe is bored, as usual. He'd love a friend to share things with. So he writes a letter and sends it as far as possible across the other side of the horizon. There he finds a pen pal: Penguin. 

My take: This grew on me as it went along; by the time Giraffe and Pelican were making drawings of what they thought Penguin looked like, I was utterly charmed. Will recommend to 1st and 2nd grade teachers as jumping-off points for pen pal projects.







Charlie and Mouse, two young brothers, enjoy a day out together, attending an imaginary party and collecting rocks.

My take: Old fashioned, simple, and sweet. Lots of repetitive text for the early reader. And I love that Mouse wore a tutu to the party.










Middle Grades


Eleven-year-old Fern's rundown home borders a pristine forest, where her impoverished family hunts and forages for food. It's also her refuge from the crushing responsibility of caring for her wild younger brothers and PTSD-stricken stepfather. But when a fracking company rolls into town, Fern realizes that her special grove could be ripped away, and no one else seems to care.

My takeDon't read this if you're looking for a lighthearted story. I did like that it was an "issue" novel that wasn't overly preachy. But man, Fern's house made me feel cold and hungry.






Poetry


Out of gratitude for the poet's art form, Newbery Award winning author and poet Kwame Alexander, along with Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth, present original poems that pay homage to twenty famed poets who have made the authors' hearts sing and their minds wonder.

My take: Should be on college syllabi for poetry classes. Will recommend to RI Mock Newbery committee. Not all the poems worked for me (in part because I'm not a fan of some of the poets being celebrated), but the sheer amount of work that went into this achievement is evident. Favorites:

  • I Like Your (celebrating e.e. cummings)
  • Jazz Jive Jam (celebrating Langston Hughes)
  • How Billy Collins Writes a Poem (celebrating Billy Collins)
  • No Idle Days (celebrating William Carlos Williams)

Also the artwork is gorgeous.







Sunday, June 18, 2017

Grade 1 E Book Covers

This year, first graders learned about call numbers, which work like addresses for books. Although they're called "numbers," most only have letters ... kind of confusing. We focused on th the E (for Everyone) section.

Every picture book call number has "E" as the first line, and then the first letter of the author's last name as the second line. For example, if I wrote a book, the call number would be

E
M

What would YOUR call number be?

Students figured out theirs and created an E book they "wrote" as their final library assignment. Here are some of their book covers: